Change Address

VOTE411 Voter Guide

HONOLULU COUNCILMEMBER, DIST II

Duties: The County Council is the legislative branch of the County. Council is responsible for passing the laws that govern the city and county, as enacted by ordinance and written in the Charter of the City and Council of Honolulu.Areas Represented: Mililani Mauka, Wahiawa, Mokuleia, Waialua, Haleiwa, Pupukea, Sunset Beach, Kahuku, Laie, Hauula, Punaluu, Kahana, Kaaawa, Kualoa, Waiahole, and Kahaluu.How Elected: The County Council consists of nine members elected from geographical districts. Members are elected on a non-partisan basis. A Councilmember must be a qualified resident and registered voter of the district from which the person is to be elected.Term: Four years, limited to a maximum of two consecutive full terms.Base Salary: Councilmember - $68,904; Chairperson - $76968

Click a candidate icon to find more information about the candidate. To compare two candidates, click the "compare" button. To start over, click a candidate icon.

  • Candidate picture

    Racquel ACHIU
    (NS)

  • Candidate picture

    Lupe FUNAKI
    (NS)

  • Candidate picture

    Makuakai ROTHMAN
    (NS)

  • Candidate picture

    Chad TSUNEYOSHI
    (NS)

  • Candidate picture

    Matt WEYER
    (NS)

Biographical Information

Please provide a brief Candidate Statement describing your qualifications and why you are running for this office.

How would you address concerns about a lack of transparency at all levels of government?

What, if any, actions would you work towards in your first 100 days to address the threats facing Hawaii due to climate change?

Do you believe the response to the COVID-19 crisis could have been improved, and if so, how?

Candidate has not yet responded.
Candidate has not yet responded.
Candidate has not yet responded.
Candidate has not yet responded.
Candidate has not yet responded.
Candidate has not yet responded.
Candidate has not yet responded.
Candidate has not yet responded.
Candidate has not yet responded.
Candidate has not yet responded.
Candidate has not yet responded.
Candidate has not yet responded.
Born and raised in Hawaii, and a long-time resident of Wahiawa, Chad Tsuneyoshi is a former United States Army combat medic, a marriage and family counselor, business owner and father of two. He’s been an advocate and liaison between the community and 3 former Honolulu City Councilmembers of District 2, including Council Chair Ernie Martin. He has walked the entire area at least 7 times speaking to thousands of residents, business owners, military, community groups, keiki, kupuna, and even tourists and transients.
I believe the lack of transparency at all levels of government come down to well thought out, strategic, and organized management of information, data, and communication and relationship development. I would make sure that we make it our practice to be transparent because it is a vital component to building public trust and accountability through proactive disclosure, open data, and financial disclosure. There are a number of things that are in place at this time like Open Data, 311, and the Sunshine Law but there should be a concerted effort to abide by and constantly update modes of communication and access to information and data to the public. Something I believe I have been doing and that I’m known for in District 2 as a citizen, business owner, and advocate between government and the community.
In my first 100 days, I would work with the Department of Planning and Permitting to map out the entire District 2 area. By having an updated map, the community can identify areas that are known targets of consistent flooding, road and land erosions, and other dangers that the county has known about but have not dealt with. I’d start a strategic process of planning so that the near and far future issues are considered when developing, redeveloping, and planning. Historically we have not addressed pressing and recurring issues that cost the residents, taxpayers statewide, and our government on all levels a lot more than necessary. The longer we wait, the more costly it will become.
In hindsight, I do believe the Covid-19 crisis presented areas that we can improve on in government. It showed us that our lines of communication are not tight, cooperation between branches of government are not clearly laid out, and that we don't have a clear chain of command for the varying types of crisis. As a military veteran, I know the importance of having such a plan and would make sure that the county take the lead on this going forward.
Campaign Email matt@mattweyer.com
Campaign Phone 808-782-1044
Campaign Mailing Address PO Box 970422
Waipahu, HI 96797
After graduating from Mid-Pacific and UH Manoa, I dedicated my career to helping others: supporting our federal judiciary at U.S. Pretrial Services; overseeing human resources for a small business; working as an attorney in private practice; serving as a domestic violence prosecutor for our City; and conducting policy research and drafting potential legislation as a policy advisor at the City Council. During the pandemic, I saw our residents struggling and joined the Department of Community Services, where I now work as a planner to help provide housing opportunities for our families and services for those experiencing homelessness.

With my experience in all three branches of city government and my small business and private practice experience, I want to help our community navigate the City and all of its complexities. As a prior prosecutor and civil litigator, I intend to fight to achieve all that our district deserves to improve the quality of life for our residents.
I support campaign finance reform and citizen-funded elections to limit the impact of private money in politics. We can also change from opt-in to opt-out voter registration and implement ranked-choice voting to ensure each vote counts. “Gut and replace” should also be a practice of the past, for we must operate transparently and give the public a meaningful opportunity to weigh in on pending legislation.

With that in mind, there are also specific things that the City can do. The COVID-19 pandemic brought a new wave of community involvement as remote testimony became a component of public hearings. Government must maintain virtual participation by phone or video conferencing to ensure the residents of District 2 and all other communities outside of town can meaningfully participate. I also appreciate that the Council is bound by Sunshine Law and other restrictions that increase transparency and ensure that Council matters are discussed and decided before the public’s eyes.
To mitigate the impacts of climate change we must: reduce our reliance on fossil fuels by increasing access to EV charging, expediting the transition to an electric bus fleet, supporting multimodal transportation, better managing our waste, and much more.

To prepare our community for what’s already at our doorstep we must: follow through with a managed retreat plan; increase emergency shelter access and signage across the district, including a resilience hub in Koolauloa; increase stream maintenance; invest in flood mitigation; and invest in much needed infrastructure, including our roads and bridges.

Millions of federal dollars are available through the U.S. Fish & Wildlife and Departments of Transportation, Agriculture, and Housing and Urban Development. In the next budget, we can fund a full-time position dedicated to identifying and applying for these federal grant opportunities to ensure that our community can be fully prepared and kept safe.
Our COVID-19 response would have been improved by better communication and increasing access to life-saving information, including access for communities with limited English proficiency. The City must be proactive, engage the community, and have staff that can navigate the many languages and cultures that make Hawaii so unique.

Other large cities similar to Honolulu’s size also have public health officers. The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the need for the City to have its own expert to rely on during emergencies and non-emergency situations to evaluate and advocate for policies intended to promote the health and safety of our community. With the pandemic winding down, the city must remain vigilant and continue to rely on the most up-to-date science and data.