Voter Guide

Find Your Races

Frisco City Council, Place 6 Choose 1

3-year term, elected citywide. Must be at least 18 years old, a United States citizen, a qualified voter, and a resident of the city. The City Council establishes city policy through ordinances and resolutions.

Voter Guide

Candidate picture

Sadaf Haq

Co-Founder and Business Development for Pain Management of North Dallas

Biographical Information

Education Bachelor of Science in Biology, Masters in Public Health - both earned from State University of New York at Albany
Experience 5 years of extensive community service, board appointments and leadership within the City of Frisco and other non-profit / NGOs, training and experience as a public health professional and advocate, plus a successful small business owner
Twitter @friscosadaf
YouTube
Instagram http://instagram.com/friscosadaf

Growth: Collin County is one of the fastest growing counties in the state. What should the City Council do, if anything, to address population growth?

We are fortunate that Frisco city leaders anticipated the boom over 20 years ago, and made wise future investments to help prepare us for today. Today’s Council must be also wise enough to meet residents’ needs today, while planning for what will be needed tomorrow. This requires investing in infrastructure, and anticipating what impacts there will be on Frisco as a result of the dramatic shifts in the commercial real estate market and in workspaces, wrought by COVID-19. (Longer-term planning is best considered after the dust has settled from immediate pandemic recovery efforts, though.)

Economy: Should the City Council try to attract more businesses? Why or why not?

Businesses bring: jobs that employ Frisco residents, sales tax and property tax revenues that fill city coffers, and goods and services that Frisco residents need and want - keeping those dollars local. Frisco should never stop trying to recruit and retain a robust business community. We are the envy of cities across America for our strong 4A economic development corporation (EDC), a program approved by Frisco voters which has attracted billions of dollars of capital value without draining our property tax revenue. I will staunchly defend Frisco’s EDC against anyone who want to defund it.

Finance: What would you like to change, if anything, about the city budget and taxation?

I don’t care for the emphasis placed by certain statewide libertarian groups upon the idea that Texas cities should no longer rely on tax rates, moving instead to a fixed percentage cap, which reduces a government’s ability to budget and plan. To insist that a taxing entity must reject the reasonable use of a rate, with the ability to vary with the economy and inflation, is an unrealistic approach to governance, and prevents cities from properly planning and projecting. I aligned with Frisco City Council members who were opposed in 2019 to ETR legislation for its weakening of local control.

Trust: How will you work with residents to earn their trust in city government?

After I made the decision to run for City Council in 2020, my campaign conducted polling among a cross-section of Frisco before the filing window opened, in which voters confirmed decisively that honesty and integrity were their most desired qualities in an elected official. I am someone with a reputation for listening respectfully to everyone, for keeping my word, and for collaborating with compromise. I insist that those around me also behave with respect for our history and for others. I believe this approach will demonstrate in word and deed that Frisco residents can trust my leadership.

Services: What changes should be made, if any, to city services? What would it take to make these changes?

I feel that Frisco does deliver municipal services that meet the high expectations of our residents, and have successfully done so via one of the lowest tax rates in the area. I do understand that City Council may have to make some hard decisions for the budget years ahead, as the full impacts of COVID-19 become more clear, and I look forward to assisting in those determinations. Where I think the city can improve is in how it communicates services and updates to all residents; people receive information very differently today, especially in our ever-increasingly-more-diverse community.

Other issues: What other important issues are facing the City Council, and how would you address them?

After several years of service to Frisco, and hearing honest feedback of residents from all walks of life and backgrounds, I've noticed a trend in the concerns shared: many residents do not feel heard or seen at City Hall. They feel like only a certain “political elite” can successfully engage with city leadership on what matters to them. I do not feel this to be the case, in my personal experience – but I also understand that everyone’s reality is their own. I believe it’s time for our city leaders to listen very conscientiously to their neighbors who feel they are not represented.

Voter Guide

Sai Krishna

Biographical Information

Growth: Collin County is one of the fastest growing counties in the state. What should the City Council do, if anything, to address population growth?

Candidate has not yet responded.

Economy: Should the City Council try to attract more businesses? Why or why not?

Candidate has not yet responded.

Finance: What would you like to change, if anything, about the city budget and taxation?

Candidate has not yet responded.

Trust: How will you work with residents to earn their trust in city government?

Candidate has not yet responded.

Services: What changes should be made, if any, to city services? What would it take to make these changes?

Candidate has not yet responded.

Other issues: What other important issues are facing the City Council, and how would you address them?

Candidate has not yet responded.

Voter Guide

Candidate picture

Brian Livingston

Commercial Banker

Biographical Information

Education The University of Texas at Austin, BBA Finance, The University of Texas at Dallas, MS Accounting and MBA
Experience Served as Frisco City Council, Place #6 and the Frisco Budget & Audit Committee 2017 - Current, Previously served as Vice Chairman of Board of Adjustments/ Construction Board of Appeals and Board member of Visit Frisco.
Twitter @brian4frisco
Instagram @brianlivingstonforfrisco

Growth: Collin County is one of the fastest growing counties in the state. What should the City Council do, if anything, to address population growth?

The Frisco City Council should make sure that our first responders (Fire & Police) remain fully staffed, equipped and trained ahead of our growth to make sure that we never fall behind. People move to Frisco for the schools but stay here because they feel safe and we must maintain to keep Frisco growing and prosperous. We also need to make sure that our roads and infrastructure are not only expanded but that the older parts are maintained and refreshed so we don't create 2 Friscos. Ultimately, we have to be able to slow the increases in traffic and congestion as we continue growing.

Economy: Should the City Council try to attract more businesses? Why or why not?

Your Frisco City Council is well on its way to attracting more significant businesses to Frisco than every before. Unfortunately this takes time and must remain confidential until the proper time to make it public. The improvement in our Economic Development Corporation over the last 3 years has been significant and amazing to watch. We definitely need to make sure that we get well paying jobs in the northern part of Frisco to help reduce southbound traffic driving through Frisco.

Finance: What would you like to change, if anything, about the city budget and taxation?

Our tax rate is currently $0.4465 per $100 in valuation of real estate and of that only $0.2915 goes towards maintenance & operations. The other $0.15508 is dedicated to voter approved bond debt. So when you consider the quality of services and life in Frisco the tax rate that we actually control is very low especially when compared to cities around us. However, I think that we should start looking at limiting the incentives we give primarily to those given by our EDC/CDC and start being less aggressive with incentives given directly by the city to avoid future potential tax increases.

Trust: How will you work with residents to earn their trust in city government?

As the current Frisco City Councilman Place #6, I have held coffees where I invited citizens to join me and ask questions or express concerns. During my first term, I delivered on every campaign promise I made, I voted against higher density apartments, supported first responders and to put the city in position to maintain low tax rates and hopefully cut taxes in the future. I respond to text, emails and calls almost immediately when my constituents reach out to me and try to respond to any requests quickly as well. No matter the issue, I have spoken open and honestly even when not popular.

Services: What changes should be made, if any, to city services? What would it take to make these changes?

While there are a lot of people that want us to expand our services to cover a lot of things that we either aren't ready for and/or isn't really the place of government to participate in, I think we are currently doing a great job. However, I would like for us to put more resources towards our Traffic Engineering department to get our traffic and congestion issues under better control as fast as possible and prepared for the future growth.

Other issues: What other important issues are facing the City Council, and how would you address them?

As we continue growing as a city, we will have to work hard to maintain the small town feel that makes us a special place to live, we must keep our first responders ahead of the growth curve, we have to get ahead of our infrastructure to keep traffic moving and at the same time prepare to take care of the existing infrastructure that will soon start becoming old and need our attention as well. My plan to address these and unknown issues, is to start slowing our city incentives and allow our general fund to receive the funds in the future. Our EDC and CDC are strong and able to incentive growth