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Texas Railroad Commissioner

Six-year term. The railroad commissioner is one of the three-member Texas Railroad Commission. The commission has no regulatory authority concerning railroads. Instead, it regulates the oil and gas industry, gas utilities, pipeline safety, safety in the liquefied petroleum gas industry, and surface coal and uranium mining. Current salary: $137,500» What does the railroad commissioner do? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5uZASQUUOs&feature=youtu.bePeríodo de 6 años. Debe tener por lo menos 25 años de edad, ser residente de Texas y ser un votante registrado. Regula la industria energética, incluyendo la prevención de la contaminación, así como el sellado de pozos y la rehabilitación de sitios, la seguridad de las tuberías y la prevención de daños, la minería a cielo abierto de carbón y uranio, las tarifas de servicios públicos de gas y los combustibles alternativos

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  • James "Jim" Wright
    (Rep)

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    Chrysta Castañeda
    (Dem)

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    Matt Sterett
    (L)

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    Katija 'Kat' Gruene
    (Grn)

Biographical Information

Qualifications: What training, experience and background qualify you for this position?

Pipelines: What can the Texas Railroad Commission do to further ensure compliance with pipeline regulations to avoid environmental harm?

Natural Resources: What can the Texas Railroad Commission do to promote the reclamation and reuse of water resources used in fracking operations?

Flaring: What, if any, further regulations or limits are needed to address the impact of flaring on the environment?

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I have over 30 years of experience in the oil and gas industry, as an engineer and attorney. I know the complex technical and legal issues that face the industry. I will protect our natural resources and environment and keep industry functioning.
The Commission should increase safety and emissions monitoring to end catastrophic failures and eliminate methane leaks. It should implement a more robust information system to know where all smaller intrastate and gathering lines are located and permitted. The legislature must assign oversight authority for pipeline permitting, right-of-way acquisition and condemnation.
A reclamation and reuse program would ensure less fresh water is used and would reduce the need for disposal wells. Program guidelines, informed by experts, could provide best practices for operators. Updated permitting and reporting requirements would ensure operator compliance. To work, oversight must be provided by adequately trained and compensated professionals.
If the Railroad Commission would simply enforce the laws on the books, we would dramatically impact greenhouse gasses and pollution. Flaring and venting of natural gas are illegal activities and the Railroad Commission should enforce those laws, which Texans enacted long ago to protect our natural resources and our environment.
I run a small Oil & Gas Software company.

Clients use the software to forecast well data. Sometimes, that data is from the RRC.

I've been in the building & met w/ a few RRC team members - I'm familiar with the organization's digital operations.
Punt the responsibility to the courts. Texas is a litigious state. I think the Texas courts have broadly supported property rights.

As a Libertarian, I believe in strong private property rights.

I also don't believe in expanding regulators activities.

If / when environmental harm is done, I'd rather is be settled in a court than a government agency.
As a Libertarian, I believe in strong private property rights.

I also don't believe in expanding regulators activities.

If / when environmental harm is done, I'd rather is be settled in a court than a government agency.
I'm against Flaring on the grounds that it's *wasteful*. We have a limited amount of natural resources. In the past, when we've had to import, it has meant foreign policy that led to wars.

Title 3, Sub-chapter B Sec. 91.015 of the TX Natural Resources Code (statutes.capitol.texas.gov/Docs/NR/htm/NR.91.htm) calls to "prevent waste of oil, gas". The RRC has not upheld this.
3 decades of project & bus.mgmt. along w/consensus-based facilitation; 2 decades of experience doing legislative work, coalition building, campaigning, and leading an environmental & social justice movement in a litigious & hostile environment.
First, no new pipelines. Second, properly inspect and review existing permits for compliance and safety. Third, hold corporations accountable for violations including restoration of & restitution in areas already harmed. Fourth, stop taking political contributions from those they are regulating. Fifth, enforce new 2020 regulations, including updating existing pipelines.
Ban Fracking Period. There is no need for such a highly wasteful, unsafe, and unsustainable practice. All water used in these operations is no longer potable and because it is chemically altered, scientists believe it may never be returned to the state of water - h2o. The emerging tech of onsite carrier gas desalination plants could become a valid option if successful.
There are solutions, we just need to require them: power oxidation process, flare gas power generation, flare gas reinjection in secondary oil recovery, feedstock for petrochemical plants, LNG, CNG, & a small reactor that inexpensively breaks water and methane into carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the field (syngas), which can then be used for energy and industrial products