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Commerce City Council Ward IV

Council Member Ward IV is a four year term. Vote for no more than one. All municipal races are held as nonpartisan.Watch the candidate forum at c3gov.com/video or on CCTV Channel 8/881HD.

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  • Steve Davis

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    John DuPriest
    (NP)

  • Mike A. Flores
    (NP)

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    Susan Noble
    (NP)

Biographical Information

How would you prioritize spending in light of increased or decreased revenues in your City?

What are two of your greatest concerns in your City over the next four years and how would you address them?

Describe your style of conflict resolution.

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Background I am a Colorado native and graduated from the University of Colorado at Denver, and have been living in Commerce City for a little over five years. I am running for City Council because I believe that our democratic institutions work best and can only be maintained through the active participation of people in our communities. We need to have representation by people of sound judgment and who are willing to listen to a broad variety of voices when making decisions which impact our daily lives.
Contact e-mail john@dupriest4council.com
Contact phone 303-909-1426
As Commerce City grows, our revenues have grown as well. This does not mean that there is enough money to meet all of the demands for services within our city. The health and safety of the residents of Commerce City must be the highest priority of city government. Health priorities can include obvious things like clean air and water and trash removal, and less obvious but no less important items such as open spaces, recreation and parks. Prioritizing safety means ensuring that the Police Department is fully staffed and equipped, and also ensuring that our roads and traffic controls meet the needs of the residents of Commerce City. These are just the most basic functions of a city, but the most basic are the highest priority.
The two biggest issues facing Commerce City in the coming years are oil and gas activity and growth. The development of oil and gas resources in a safe and responsible manner require that drilling activity be done away from neighborhoods, in industrial areas or in places that are at a reasonable distance from developed areas. Growth is a fact of life in Commerce City, and will continue to be for the foreseeable future. By managing our growth, we can ensure that a mix of housing types is built so that working families and more wealthy families all have the opportunity to attain quality housing. Residential growth and economic growth need to go hand-in-hand. Attracting a wide variety of businesses from small business to large corporations, in a range of industries will ensure that Commerce City is a good place to work and do business as well as a great place to live.
My style of conflict resolution is best described as consultative. I listen closely to others in order to understand what the underlying issues are that are blocking a consensus or agreement. Understanding why someone is taking the position that they are can lead to ways that agreements can be reached without somebody “losing” or feeling like they’ve been ignored. Treating everybody with respect even when an agreement is not possible increases the likelihood that a working relationship can still be maintained, allowing future agreements and collaborations to happen. Diverse perspectives generally lead to better decisions and outcomes, and listening to those with whom I disagree is critical to my approach.
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Background Our community matters to me. I first became involved in Ward 4 by attending Metro District meetings. Then last year when we learned of the threat of multi-well oil and gas sites and residential drilling, neighbors and I founded North Range Concerned Citizens (NRCC), a coalition representing 30 subdivisions that face the concentration, intensity and harmful impacts of 11 potential sites and 300 wells fracking under neighborhoods. We believe that industrial activity is incompatible with residential areas. Our efforts have held off underground fracking of some 30-square miles of the north range and all of Ward 4 for which oil and gas operations are proposed. As a result of my activism, I was a council appointee to the Commerce City Oil and Gas Focus Group. I have represented NRCC at state, county and municipal hearings and taken our story directly to Colorado’s governor. I am also a community representative to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment PFAS Working Group that is studying potential regulations for the toxic human-made chemicals (Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) found in drinking water and groundwater. Endorsers of my campaign for the Ward 4 seat include the Denver Area Labor Federation and Conservation Colorado. I am a native Coloradan and CU graduate. As a former journalist, researching and sharing information come as second nature to me. During my career and as a community advocate, I have worked with businesses, groups and communities to find solutions to pressing issues including: land use and planning, economic development, governance, gun violence prevention and water stewardship. My husband Phil and I chose Reunion for our home six years ago. Like many families in Ward 4, we are happy that the next generation of Nobles lives only a few blocks away.
Contact phone (303) 286-3694
Twitter @susansnoble
I believe the priorities can be determined from a clear vision of the future of the city. The vision can be developed by the council AND through, most importantly, public participation, which is necessary to assure buy-in of the direction. Many communities in Colorado have achieved a common vision through a facilitated process call “future search conferences”. I would champion and promote a similar approach for our community. As a City Council we must put the vision to work and not simply upload the plan to the internet to be ignored. We need to ask ourselves tough questions. Do we want to be a city that relies on revenues derived from Suncor refinery in the south and heavy industry-scale oil and gas operations in the north? Or do we want to be a city that moves boldly into the future, for future generations? We can become a leader in Colorado when we of Commerce City focus on embracing and attracting new technology and green energy, providing sustainable jobs with sustainable wages,
1. Public health, safety and welfare. I would put residents’ health, safety and welfare first. If we allow oil and gas fracking, we are prioritizing short-term interests over our residents’ long-term quality of life. To attract businesses, restaurants, and other amenities that residents have long-wanted, we cannot allow the degradation of air, water and neighborhoods. I would oppose industrial activity in residential areas and fracking under homes and schools. 2. Development of new business, housing and infrastructure to support sustainable pragmatic growth that ensures we are a “quality community for a lifetime”. I would seek new rules that rein in metropolitan districts, particularly their taxing and bonding. We need to protect unsuspecting home buyers. To do this, we need communication, greater transparency within the city government and city council members who listen to citizens and weave their input, rather than that of special interests, into council decision-making.
As committed group members we attempt to resolve group conflicts by actively communicating information about our conflicting motives or ideologies to the rest of group (e.g., intentions; reasons for holding certain beliefs) and by engaging in collective negotiation. I prefer to work from a point of expanding common ground instead of first trying to resolve primary differences. Based on the Trist–Emery model, participants then have a foundation for adding to what is already common ground and can work in a more collaborative manner. As one of nine council appointees to Commerce City's Oil and Gas Focus Group--made of up residents both affiliated and not affiliated with the oil and gas industry--we succeeded in reaching common ground in two significant areas: protecting our air quality and establishing reverse setbacks (oil and gas operations set back or new construction set back). That is a significant starting point for discussion.