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Hawaii State Senate, District 22

Duties: The Hawaii State Senate is the upper chamber of the Hawaii State Legislature. The Hawaii State Senate is a part-time body.Areas Represented: Mililani Mauka, Waipi‘o Acres, Wheeler, Wahiawa, Whitmore Village, portion of PoamohoHow Elected: The senate consists of 25 members elected from an equal number of constituent districts across the islands. A Senator must be a Hawaii resident for not less than three years, is at least 18 years old, and is a qualified voter of the senatorial district from which the person seeks to be elected. Candidates for state legislative offices who are nominated in the primary election and are unopposed in the general election will be deemed elected to the office sought after the primary election regardless of the number of votes received by that candidate (Hawaii State Constitution, Article III, Section 4).Term: Four years, not subject to term limits. Base Salary (2020): $62,604 plus $225/day if living outside Oahu, $10/day for members living on Oahu; Senate President - $70,104

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  • Donovan DELA CRUZ
    (Dem)

  • Banner S. FANENE
    (NP)

  • Candidate picture

    John E. MILLER
    (Rep)

Biographical Information

Please provide a brief Candidate Statement describing your qualifications and why you are running for this office.

What are your top two goals and how will you achieve them if elected?

What do you think about the state of women in Hawaii's elected and appointed public offices? What have you done to support women in government? What will you do?

How would you address concerns about a lack of transparency at all levels of government?

Do you support automatically registering people to vote when they apply for a driver’s license or state identification card, provided they can voluntarily opt out of registering. (Senate Bill 2005 passed the senate and is currently in the Hawaii House Judiciary.)

What, if any, actions would you work towards in your first 100 days to address the threats facing Hawaii due to climate change?

Do you believe the response to the COVID-19 crisis could have been improved, and if so, how?

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Phone (808) 451-1095
Email Address john@votejmiller.com
Twitter @na
I have been a pastor for 20 years and worked with many different types of people in the USA and other countries. I have a Master of Ministry Degree from Point Loma Nazarene University. I have opened directed and facilitated two Life Skills Learning Centers, formerly called Domestic Violence Prevention. I work with drug and alcohol addiction recovery ministries as well. My experience is in the field working directly with the people that the laws of the land effect. I am running for office now because I believe the people of the State of Hawaii don't feel like they are being seen or heard by elected officials. Most elections in Hawaii are decided before the election begins because of so few candidates are willing to run against the majority.
First, I want to help in any way I can to get the economy opened safely and as quickly as possible. People are hurting financially and some businesses may never recover financially if we don't reopen Hawaii quickly. In addition, I want to make sure all the federal funds from the Cares Act are put into the hands of the people of Hawaii for daily living expenses, unemployment benefits, rental assistance and food. Second, I want to be an advocate for foster care children and families, children and adults with special needs and their families, victims of child abuse and domestic violence, sex trafficking, and those with addictions and mental illness. Many homeless people in Hawaii suffer from some of these issues and they need help now.
We could always do better to open up more opportunities for women and other groups that have been marginalized in the past. I have supported women candidates and elected officials in many ways. I have encouraged young women to follow their dreams and go after the desires from their hearts wherever that may lead them. I will continue to encourage youth and adult women to get involved in politics and be an inspiration for others to follow. I will support legislation that knocks down any hurdles for women to do that. I will seek alliances with all people in the legislature to help make that a reality. I will be an example by my words and actions for others to see and follow. I will continue to support women candidates and elected officials.
I would support legislation that requires all elected officials to have pre-session, midsession, and post-session public meetings. Where the elected officials answered questions in a public forum. The answer would not be allowed to be scripted responses but must but truthful and transparent answers about the legislation they supported, voted for, or opposed. I believe you would see a tremendous change very quickly if elected officials know they had to be accountable for their actions in the legislature. It's concerning to me that in the 2018 election, that the candidates who ran on increasing the minimin wage to $15 an hour and received endorsements for that reason, after the election even though they had the majority did not keep promises.
I struggle with registering someone to vote without their knowledge and consent. I do believe that they should be made aware of that opportunity and given the option to do so. I think if a person isn't willing to register to vote on their own the likelihood of them voting is low. If I could see tangible evidence that it would help make it easier and more assessable for people to vote I would consider changing my mind on this. I do believe that we should seek and find as many ways as possible to get as many qualified people to vote as possible and then get them to vote as well. The voter turnout is low because many times the voters feel like their vote doesn't make any difference. Giving the voter more choices will help voter turnout.
Climate change effect is inevitable on an island state due to sea-level rise. 85% of the highways and hotels are located on the coast so we need to start making plans to move these highways further from the coastline. The University of Hawaii has a professor of engineering who has written a paper on how we can rebuild the shorelines on beaches without damaging the reefs. We will have to start putting away funds and resources to get to work on this asap. Hurricane season is starting and we may be getting some damage this year due to storms and earthquakes across the pacific. I have heard it said recently on this subject we need to think globally and act locally. I am not an engineer or scientist but these folks can help us if we listen..
We have never in my lifetime had a pandemic like this one. It came quickly and shut the entire world down for an unprecedented amount of time. I think the leaders made good decisions in regards to keeping the death total down. That being said there is always room for improvement when we look back on any situation if we are willing to learn. I think it might have been helpful for the governor and the mayors to be on the same page when it comes to overarching policy decisions for emergency events in the future. It can be confusing to hear different policies from leaders in response to a crisis. In addition, the legislature and governor could try and find ways to work together on the handling of the Cares federal funds that Hawaii needs now.