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Colorado State House District 46

The Colorado House of Representatives is the lower house of the Colorado General Assembly, the State legislature of the U.S. state of Colorado. The House is composed of 65 members. Representatives are elected to two-year terms, and are limited to four terms in office but can run again after a two-year respite. The entire House is elected in each general election.Cámara de Representantes de ColoradoLa Cámara de Representantes de Colorado es la cámara inferior de la Asamblea General de Colorado, la legislatura Estatal del estado de Colorado de los EE.UU. La Cámara de Representantes está compuesta por 65 miembros. Los Representantes son elegidos para servir mandatos de dos años, y están limitados a servir cuatro mandatos, pero pueden volver a postularse después de un descanso de dos años. Se elige a la Cámara entera en cada elección general.__________ELECTION INFO: General Election ballots will start to be mailed on October 9th, 2020. Voter Service and Polling Centers open on Monday, October 19th, 2020. Ballots must be received via mail or at drop-off no later than Tuesday, November 3rd, 2020, by 7 pm. If you have not received your ballot or need a replacement, contact your local Clerk & Recorder Elections Office.INFROMACIÓN SOBRE LAS ELECCIONES: Las papeletas de votación para las Elecciones Generales empezarán a ser enviadas el 9 de octubre del 2020. Los Centros de Servicios Electorales se abren el lunes, 19 de octubre del 2020. Las papeletas electorales deben ser enviadas por correo o entregadas en un centro de entrega a más tardar a las 7pm el martes, 3 de noviembre del 2020. Si no ha recibido su papeleta electoral o necesita un reemplazo, comuníquese con su Funcionario Oficial de la Oficina de Elecciones local.

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  • Candidate picture

    Jonathan Ambler
    (R)

  • Daneya Esgar
    (D)

  • Candidate picture

    John Pickerill
    (L)

Biographical Information

What is your number one priority and why?

How will you address the economic crisis that has resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic?

Background 10 years H.S. teacher and administrator. Degrees in Finance and Management. Raised 6 children with my wife of 31 years. Active in my church.
Contact phone 719.582.4306
Education is my number one priority. All across the country but especially in Colorado, education serves political agendas more than it serves students, families, and communities. Many great teachers leave the profession because of stress. In many instances, schools serve welfare needs more than educational needs. The demands on teachers and administrators to “perform” on tests that have very little relevance to students’ futures are unnecessary. These issues speak to the quality of education, but there is another side to consider.

Voters used Amendment 23 to specify the amount of money they wanted to spend on education. The legislature reneged on that trust and adopted the Budget Stabilization Factor (aka the negative factor). Since then billions of dollars have been spent on other budget items. It is time to fix both problems, school quality, and school finance.
The question implies that there wasn’t a crisis before the pandemic. If we use the budget stabilization factor (aka the negative factor) to judge that question then Colorado has faced a crisis since 2009. Billions of dollars have been taken from students, teachers, parents, and school districts contrary to the wishes of voters. Since that time, both political parties have furthered their budgetary agendas. In other words, Colorado has been living on borrowed money for the last decade. Even a small crisis would have put our state into virtual bankruptcy. We are supposed to have a balanced budget, but enough bureaucratic manipulation can make anything “look” balanced. First and foremost, we need to clean up the transparency of state finances so that the average voter can understand it. Then we need to increase revenues by being more business-friendly not by raising taxes. Then we need to control our expenses by respecting voters’ priorities for special projects.

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Background Over 20 years of experience as a manufacturing engineer. Retired U.S. Navy nuclear submarine officer. On the Board of Directors of San Isabel Electric Association cooperative.
Contact phone 7654267668
Twitter @ElectPickerill
Legislation clarifying that the state has the right and the duty to declare null and void any federal act that the state legislature determines to violate the U.S. Constitution or is not a power granted to the federal government by Article I Section 8 therein.
Immediately lift all government-imposed restrictions on businesses. A new study of antibodies, T cells and B cells found that immunity doesn’t go away just because the antibodies do. It looked at the multi-layers of the human immune system and how those infected developed virus-specific T cells which remain in our body for years and mount an immune response if the virus ever returns. Studies in the journal Nature and statements from the director of the National Institute of Health also support this position. months of COVID-19 data clarifying who is at risk and who isn’t, now shows us the way forward. According to Colorado data, working age individuals (<60 years old) also have a very low risk of hospitalization (<8%) or death (<0.5%) from COVID-19. As they return to normal operation their revenues will improve allowing them to restore much-needed jobs in our community. At the same time these individuals will gain herd immunity quickly to protect our elderly population.