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NC House of Representatives District 19

The North Carolina House of Representatives is the lower house of the North Carolina General Assembly. The House of Representatives consists of 120 members who serve a term of two years. Each member represents an average of 79,462 residents, as of the 2010 Census. The presiding officer of the House of Representatives is the Speaker of the House, who holds powers similar to those of the Senate President pro-tem. The Speaker is elected by the members from their membership for a two-year term. The Speaker’s duties include maintaining order in the House and appointing members to the House standing committees.The North Carolina General Assembly, of which the House is a part, is to convene a new regular session every two years, and the dates for these sessions are set by law. The NC legislature makes decisions on the budget: taxes, tax credits, economic development, education funding, Pre-K, the courts, Medicaid, etc. It also passes laws that set environmental standards such as water and air quality, tax rates, tax credits, criminal justice. Legislators in both chambers serve two-year terms without term limits. Sessions begin at noon on the third Wednesday after the second Monday in January.

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  • Charlie Miller
    (Rep)

  • Candidate picture

    Marcia Morgan
    (Dem)

Biographical Information

1. What do you see as your most important priority if you are elected? [Youtube video for this question or text or both].

2. Education policy and funding issues have been in the news lately. What are your views and priorities on how this should be addressed in the coming year?

3. Tax policy can be used to address many issues –giving subsidies to companies coming to NC, balancing the needs of urban and rural areas, providing family support such as the earned-income tax credit, etc. What are your views about the tax policies in NC?

4. Many communities in North Carolina are experiencing significant violence. Do you think that changes to the laws in our state would improve safety in our communities?

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Age (optional) 73
Contact Phone (910) 707-0462
Twitter @ElectMMorgan
Position/philosophy statement I’m committed to protecting the environment, boosting the economy, supporting public education and ensuring equality for all NC citizens.
I have three main priorities: (1) to restore education in NC to a place of pride, which includes paying teachers a respectable wage. A better-educated population is the foundation for a better future. This, in turn, supports (2) building a better economy through increasing the minimum wage, which in turn helps individuals afford better housing, and encourages new industries to come to this area. This further ties into (3) creating a cleaner environment through strengthening the DEQ, enforcing standards that currently exist, and getting rid of the Hardison Amendment which prevents NC from adopting stricter standards than the federal government.
As a former educator at all levels--from Head Start and public school to serving on the graduate faculty at Smith College--I have an understanding of the challenges our educators face. We must ensure we’re attracting and retaining our talented educators by paying them appropriately and giving them the resources they need to help our state’s most important asset--our children--to succeed.
Over the past several years, our General Assembly has been focused on cutting taxes for corporations while ignoring the impact on hardworking middle-class families. Trickle-down economics has proven not to work; we must provide real tax relief to the middle and lower class rather than smoke-and-mirror “tax cuts” that end up negatively affecting our citizens.
Yes. I think systemic change is essential, including ending the school-to-prison pipeline, reforming cash bail and ensuring juveniles who commit crimes are given the opportunity for rehabilitation rather than sentencing them to adult jail. I also think economic issues need to be addressed, particularly raising the minimum wage, so that individuals and families are better able to live comfortably and less likely to turn to drugs out of despair.