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Virginia House District 22

The Virginia General Assembly consists of two chambers. The House is the lower chamber and is composed of 100 Delegates. Delegates serve 2-year terms, represent over 80,000 Virginians, and receive a yearly salary of $17,740. House District 22 includes part of the counties of Bedford, Campbell, Franklin, and part of the City of Lynchburg.The candidates' required financial disclosures are available at the Department of Elections website at www.elections.virginia.gov/resultsreports/index.html and at www.vpap.org.

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  • Kathy Byron
    (Rep)

  • Candidate picture

    Jennifer Woofter
    (Dem)

Biographical Information

What do you believe is the top legislative priority for your district, and what is your plan to address it?

What measures would you propose or support to ensure the right to vote and election integrity?

Regarding fair redistricting, (1) What is your position on the proposal for a Virginia Redistricting Commission? (2) If the constitutional amendment is adopted, what legislation would you support for the implementation and work of the commission?

What solutions would you support to reduce the current level of gun violence in Virginia?

Please see the candidate's website. The candidate's responses to the questions will be posted as soon as they are received. https://kathybyron.com/
Please see the candidate's website. The candidate's responses to the questions will be posted as soon as they are received. https://kathybyron.com/
Please see the candidate's website. The candidate's responses to the questions will be posted as soon as they are received. https://kathybyron.com/
Please see the candidate's website. The candidate's responses to the questions will be posted as soon as they are received. https://kathybyron.com/
education B.S., Political Science, University of Oregon M.A., Political Science from Virginia Tech M.Sc., Strategic Leadership Towards Sustainability, Blekinge Institute of Technology
experience Jennifer has 20 years of experience in organizational accountability, corporate sustainability, and ethical investing. She is a small business owner, sustainability consultant, Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA), former foster parent and active member of multiple community organizations.
LIVING WAGE JOBS: We have record low unemployment across Virginia, but too many of our neighbors are struggling to make ends meet. We don’t need more jobs, we need better jobs. That means targeted investments to create living-wage jobs right here in Central Virginia — especially those with annual salaries of at least $50,000 that don’t require a 4-year college degree. If those jobs happen to be part of the new green economy (like renewable energy), that’s icing on the
Voting is the foundation of our democracy, and we must do more to remove barriers to full participation. That means voting reforms like automatic voter registration, same-day voter registration, automatic restoration of rights for returning citizens and no-excuse absentee voting.
Both Republicans and Democrats do it: once they get into power, they deliberately manipulate the legislative district boundaries to stay in power. It’s called gerrymandering, and it’s got to stop. Citizens should pick their representatives, not the other way around. It’s a conflict of interest for the legislature to draw its own district lines, which is why we need to move to a nonpartisan, independent process.

Jennifer supports the Virginia Independent Redistricting Commission Amendment, comprised of eight legislative members and eight citizen members. In addition, she supports legislation that would require:

-- a wide, publicly accessible application process for those who would like to serve as commissioners -- protections that keep communities together -- language that specifically prohibits partisan gerrymandering -- all data used in the redistricting process to be made publicly available -- an online and in-person public feedback mechanism
There are few topics more polarizing than gun rights. But studies show that we are more united than meets the eye. There are plenty of commonsense steps we can take right now to reduce unintended gun violence. Things like tax breaks for gun safes, restraining orders that stop domestic abusers and those in mental crisis from getting guns, universal background checks and "Red Flag" laws. These issues have wide support across party lines.