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Knoxville City Council at Large Seat C

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Amy Midis Financial Analyst

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Campaign Phone (865) 384-1558

All cities want to attract new businesses that will provide its residents with well paying jobs. What qualities do you think a city should have to attract these kinds of businesses?

(1) City staff and administration needs to be a resource for new industries and businesses wanting to operate in Knoxville. We are economic partners and our success as a city is dependent on their financial success. (2) A trained and skilled workforce is essential especially in the current tight labor market. Their success as a business is directly linked to the skilled level of workforce they employ. (3) An attractive and vibrant community that appeals to the many generations wanting to make Knoxville their home. As individuals age, their priorities change. While job opportunities may incentivize employees to move to Knoxville, we need to continually respond to the changing needs of our residents.

What is the best use of the former St. Mary’s Hospital campus?

I support the relocation of the safety building and city courts to the former St. Mary's Hospital campus. I would like to see extensive outreach with the Oakwood Lincoln Park neighborhood before city administration and city council decides on the future of the remaining parcel. The neighborhood has a history of being directly affected by businesses being located within their boundaries: beginning with the C.B. Atkin Furniture Manufacturing firm and the Southern Railway, and most recently the Fort Loudon Recycling Facility. I would advocate that the citizens of that community be directly engaged regarding any future development within its borders.

What do you think are the best ways for the city to generate increased revenue?

Property taxes is the city budget's largest revenue stream. Additional property tax revenues could be best generated by re-purposing vacant or underutilized buildings along our corridors into new commercial spaces or new residential housing. Generational changes in the aging baby boomer population as well as the younger Millennial and Gen Z age groups are creating a new demand for urban living. The current and previous administrations have incentivizing economic development of downtown properties with PILOTS and TIFS as well as expanding opportunity zones to increase capital reinvestment in the underserved areas of town. I would continue this type of stimulus, but would more aggressively support economic development that naturally stimulates the demand for these types of sustainable developments, eventually leading to greater economic opportunities for the residents of Knoxville.

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Amelia Parker Executive Director, Peace Brigades International - USA

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Campaign Phone (865) 851-8561

All cities want to attract new businesses that will provide its residents with well paying jobs. What qualities do you think a city should have to attract these kinds of businesses?

Knoxville is a beautiful city with some of the friendliest, most laid back folks you’ll ever meet. It is also a transportation hub, with interstate 40 and 75 running through our city, and 81 just down the road. Knoxville is also within a day’s drive of half of the continental U.S. Our city is truly a gem that is ripe for businesses to locate. To attract businesses that pay their employees well, we must be a city that reflects the values of ensuring the well-being of our residents. A company that pays a living wage to their employees would not want to relocate to a city that does not prioritize taking care of the most vulnerable in our city or addressing growing wage gaps and poverty in our city. Knoxville must exhibit a commitment to the well-being of all of our residents by making greater investments in social services, addressing our affordable housing crisis, and promoting economic development among our lowest wage earners to attract businesses that value paying their employees well

What is the best use of the former St. Mary’s Hospital campus?

The absence of a healthcare facility in various parts of our community has compounding effects on our residents, effects that have already begun with the closing of the former St. Mary’s/Tennova North campus. Recently, I learned that the Walgreens Pharmacy on Broadway is no longer 24 hours. Therefore, those living in the area who experience a prescription-related health scare in the middle of the night must now travel farther to reach a pharmacy or drugstore. In thinking about what should go in the former St. Mary’s, the city must promote healthy neighborhoods by helping secure the services needed in each part of our city. With the closing of Baptist Hospital and now the Tennova North campus, much of our health services within the city limits are now concentrated in West Knox. Long term, this could lead to poorer health outcomes for our residents living in other parts of the city. Consideration of an urgent care facility at that location in partnership with the county should continue.

What do you think are the best ways for the city to generate increased revenue?

A city with a high rate of poverty like Knoxville is in need of increasing our workforce so that we have a larger population participating in our local economy. Vacant buildings in our city can be put to good use for residential and commercial purposes with tax incentives and low interest/no interest loans offered by the city. The city should prioritize those parts of the city and members of our community experiencing the highest rates of poverty. We can also increase revenue by applying a small tax to new amenities that come to town, such as the electric scooters, so that perhaps a dollar of each purpose goes directly back to the city and could be used to fund a city priority such as making our sidewalks compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act by adding curb cuts throughout the city.