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NM State Representative District 31

Represents a district in the New Mexico House of Representatives, which has 70 members. In odd-numbered years, the legislature meets for 60 days; in even-numbered years, it meets for 30 days. The Governor may call for special sessions. Representatives sponsor and vote on “reasonable and appropriate laws,” represent the constituents of their districts, and serve on legislative committees. Positions are unpaid, except for per diem expenses. Elected for a two-year term.

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    Sarahjane Allen
    (Rep)

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    Nicole Chavez
    (Rep)

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    Vicky G Estrada-Bustillo
    (Dem)

  • Candidate picture

    Patrick W Huested
    (Rep)

Biographical Information

What abilities do you have that qualify you for this office?

What is your top priority, and how do you plan to address it?

What additional water policies and actions, if any, are needed in New Mexico?

What, if anything, should be done to improve public safety?

What programs or actions, if any, would you support to provide more affordable housing?

How can New Mexico diversify its economy?

Should legislators be paid a salary? Why or why not?

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Campaign Phone 505-934-4713
Campaign Email vickyfornm@gmail.com
Campaign Website http://www.vickyfornm.com
Occupation Natural Resource Manager
As a natural resource manager for 20+ years and business owner for 10 years, I have worked with all kinds of people, leading teams, building consensus and gathering and synthesizing complicated information into easily understandable form. As leader of a statewide Hispanic organization I’ve traveled throughout NM collaborating with diverse communities to achieve shared goals. Through my experience as a legislative analyst, I know the legislative process and how to work with the legislature.
My top priority is community safety. Incarcerating violent offenders is not enough. We must address the root causes of crime in our community. Drug addiction, mental illness, homelessness, and lack of affordable housing are factors contributing to the insecurity and concern in the district. We need a wider range of programs that are implemented more efficiently. Increasing the number of healthcare providers statewide, and ensuring womens’ reproductive health programs are protected are essential.
Many New Mexico communities have outdated systems resulting in insufficient or contaminated water. More investment in water infrastructure throughout the entire state is needed along with additional resources to NMED for oversight. A state-wide assessment is needed to determine the water quantity and quality in our acequias, aquifers, and rivers. This should be the basis for determining our current and future community water needs and the industries we support in the present and future.
We must ensure that our first responders are staffed and given the support they need to do their jobs through training, recruitment and retention incentives. An increased presence of public safety officers in our communities is needed to reduce property and retail crime. Gun safety training should be required along with reducing the number of guns on the street that contribute to violent crimes. I am uniquely trained to reduce the wildfire risk and response in my district and statewide.
I strongly support faster and more efficient conversion of vacant hotels/motels and commercial properties to affordable housing. There should be incentivized requirements for developers to include a range of housing options whenever a new development is built. We need to review current rental housing and apartment rates to ensure fair leasing and adequate tenant protections are in place. I support programs like the city’s housing stability fund to address income requirements.
Continue to grow the film industry which does not negatively impact our natural resources. Create outdoor education/recreation training programs and jobs to enhance our existing tourism and service industries throughout the state. Expand our energy industry to include education, job training and employment in renewables like solar and wind. Investing in the trades and new technologies will lead to new careers.
I support a paid legislature. Currently, only those with extremely flexible jobs, or those who don’t need full-time employment can legislate. Legislators must constantly juggle between paid work and volunteer legislative tasks while in session and during interim committees. The most effective legislature is a paid legislature. It would attract more diverse candidates, a greater pool of expertise, and foster full-time dedication to governing, while reducing potential conflicts of interest.
Campaign Phone 505-270-7517
Campaign Email patrick@patrick4nmnow.com
Facebook http://None
Twitter @patrick4nmnow
Campaign Website http://www.patrick4nmnow.com
Occupation Corporate Trainer
22 years USAF experience: honed negotiating skills working with Pentagon and allies. As a corporate trainer, I'm a professional speaker and writer, so ability to express myself and dig deep into bills is comfortable. Experience at Roundhouse attending and speaking at committee meetings. Have written several op-eds that were published in ABQJ on subject of Second Amendment. USAF experience taught me how to build coalitions and small teams to accomplish whatever mission we were assigned.
Crime, as well as the border crisis, is top of everyone's mind. The criminal results we experience every day is caused by a string of intentional events, which means only focusing on one initiative, such as, "Hire more cops" will only have limited impact. We need to revisit the poorly thought-out 2016 Bail Reform, which was an initiator to this crisis; in addition, we need to look at returning qualified immunity, police recruiting/retention, incarceration facilities, and how judges operate.
Water availability is both a driver and limit on NM economic and population growth, and is always a concern in the southwest. I need to study this further, particularly the details of water management in NM (in other states, it's byzantine), as well as impacts of water agreements including the Colorado River Compact and the Governor's 50-year water plan. Plenty of us desire an economically robust NM, but the essential limiting factor is: do we have enough water? If not, can we obtain it?
Please see my "top priority" response above. In addition, Albuquerque city leaders have been accused of failing to enforce "petty" offenses such as vagrancy and trespassing. I believe in the philosophy of "broken windows policing" as applied by NYPD in the 1980s. And so I want to investigate if the legislature can write a law that would compel mayors and police chiefs to enforce a very limited set of "petty crimes" that are considered gateways to larger crimes. Let's get to the root.
Affordable housing is driven by several variables. First is supply and demand: the less the supply, the higher prices go. So, "building more" is the response. Second are mortgage rates and wages, which are a result of economic policy: inflation driven by bad policy has priced out too many young New Mexicans. Third are property taxes, which are set by municipalities and the state. It's not cosmic: build more, tax less (slash government spending), and encourage broad economic growth.
Given its vast natural resources, NM should be the "Saudi Arabia of the United States;" yet while NM is rich, our people are poor. We're too dependent upon oil and gas and federal spending, and need to follow growth models proven by AZ and TX for 40 years. Step one is reducing or eliminating personal income taxes. Step two is providing businesses large and small economic reasons to relocate or organically build here. This includes reforming GRT and offering big incentives for entrepreneurship.
Yes. Not having a salary dissuades younger New Mexicans from serving. As it is, NM legislators tend to be older, and, certainly, wealthier. We need more and different voices who are more representative of their communities, and not outliers on the hill. That said, I'd like to see governor and legislators' salaries tied to a metric that represents the general prosperity of all New Mexicans: if we do well, politicians do well; if we do poorly, their pay is automatically reduced.