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Charlotte City Council District 6

Charlotte has a council-manager form of government with a mayor and 11 council members elected every two years in November, and a professional city manager to run the day-to-day operations. The mayor and four council members are elected at-large by a city-wide vote. Seven council members are elected from districts by voters who reside in each district.The Charlotte City Council responsibilities are: Police, Fire, Water and Sewer services for the entire County; Garbage, Transportation, Infrastructure, Zoning, Land Use, Planning and Economic Development for the City of Charlotte.

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  • Tariq Scott Bokhari
    (Rep)

  • Candidate picture

    Gina Navarrete
    (Dem)

Biographical Information

What is your experience, including your 3 most important political/civic accomplishments in the last 5 years?

What is your district's most pressing issue and what steps will you take in response to it?

What are your ideas for addressing adequate affordable housing? How will you work with NCGA to obtain adequate funding to finance your objectives?

As Charlotte keeps growing, what components of the city infrastructure most need attention? How would you address them?

What plans do you have to improve public safety in Charlotte, beyond extra police officers?

How can the City of Charlotte, Mecklenburg County and Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools improve their support of each other?

What should Charlotte be doing to attract new jobs, particularly for young people and those with less than a college degree?

Will you urge your supporters/constituents to support or reject the proposed 0.25% sales tax increase? Why?

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Position/philosophy statement I believe in sustainable growth with environmentally sound policies. It is about quality of life.
Current occupation Co-president of Charlotte Women's March
Age 52
Campaign Phone (704) 268-9699
Twitter @city_gina
As part of the Charlotte Women’s March’s leadership, I have worked tirelessly to educate and encourage civic involvement of large numbers of people, particularly women. I lead the Charlotte Women’s March group effort to work with the ERA-NC Alliance in order ratify the ERA in NC. I have worked with the Charlotte Women’s March to coordinate with other organizations to register voters and get out the Vote. I - as part of CWM - focused on educating voters on 287(g) and other immigration issues. By participating in various panel discussions and educating the public, the people of Charlotte voted out 287(g). As a member of the Myers Park High School Leadership Team, I am examining policies and school practices with a diverse lens with the purpose to narrow the achievement gap and to apply punitive measures more equitable. It strongly believe it is important to examined how policies are implemented in the schools to ensure equity.
My district’s most pressing issues are around growth. Traffic congestion and how population growth are affecting current infrastructure is a priority for me. New growth has to focus on economical as well as environmental sustainability. District 6 faces a crisis of congestion and poor traffic management. With a high influx of new residents and a corresponding amount of construction, the ability of its residents to navigate the community is now strained and soon to be unworkable. I will work on transportation that is effective and attractive to residents. With proper oversight and investment in mass transit as well as providing walkable areas with green spaces, residents will continue to enjoy the high standard of living and the area will continue to attract new residents and new revenue. Investment in options which have proven successful, including effective light rail solutions, are the only way to support our growth while maintaining the environment which fuels that growth.
We must continue to use public and privately raised funds to encourage developers to build more affordable housing. We also need to provide short-term aid to families in crisis, or they will face potential homelessness. Protecting struggling residents of our older neighborhoods from increasing property taxes due to gentrification is also a priority for me. Charlotte City Council and the Board of County Commissioners must work together along with non-profit agencies to preserve the character of our historic neighborhoods and for them to remain affordable for their long-term residents; creating housing that remains affordable long term. Finally, we need to ensure that Charlotte is represented in the NCGA to the fullest extend allowed by law and to lobby the general assembly to allow Charlotte to meet its unique needs. We cannot be restricted by short sighted solutions imposed by the NCGA and should assume our role as a key area of both population and commerce within the state.
As Charlotte continues to grow, we see an ever-increasing stress on our city’s transportation network. We are attempting to overhaul key areas of high congestion, but improvements are being outpaced by our growth. Growth is welcome, it’s important, and it’s necessary, but it is not sustainable without a fundamental change in our approach to transportation. We must continue to invest in transportation options which are sustainable both from a population growth and an environmental perspective. We must expand public transportation as well as safe bike\scooter trails and pedestrian-friendly areas. Input from the communities affected by the development must be part of the discussion. It is not just about building units for housing, it is about building communities with enough infrastructure and other amenities to support those communities. Quality of life, economic sustainability and environmentally sound policies must be part of the discussion.
Addressing public safety requires City Council to work jointly with the BOCC and CMS School Board. Many violent crimes in Charlotte are being committed by our youth. A lack of economic opportunity, unstable home environment, and exposure to violence can lead to crime. We must work with the community to reduce toxic stress in at-risk youth. This must be an effort combining our community and our schools and must address mental health and substance abuse issues. Expanding programs such as The Crisis Intervention Team so that ALL CMPD are equipped to assess and respond to people in a mental health crisis, allows officers to be better trained to deal with these difficult cases, which in turn lets the public to feel safer. We also need to increase support to grassroots organizations that are working with at-risk youth and re-entry programs. These non-profit organizations need funds but often lack the structure to solve their funding needs. Thus, support to help these non-profits is crucial.
We must attract new companies by highlighting our strengths; a welcoming city with tremendous growth opportunity & high quality of life. CPCC is one of the best community colleges in the country for education in technology & other specialized fields. These programs offer certificates & associate degrees in 65 different programs, creating an educational pathway for a wide range of employment opportunities & educational levels. Combined with our excellent universities, we can create a long-term pathway for companies to tap into an expanding workforce. Vocational training also provides a pathway for HS students who are not interested in a four-year degree. We need to bring in companies that offer a wide range of employment opportunities, not just high-level jobs. Establishing Charlotte as a city with upward mobility requires delivering mobility at every educational level. This means that we must attract companies that will employ locally, not simply transplant employees from other cities.
We must attract new companies by highlighting our strengths; a welcoming city with tremendous growth opportunity & high quality of life. CPCC is one of the best community colleges in the country for education in technology & other specialized fields. These programs offer certificates & associate degrees in 65 different programs, creating an educational pathway for a wide range of employment opportunities & educational levels. Combined with our excellent universities, we can create a long-term pathway for companies to tap into an expanding workforce. Vocational training also provides a pathway for HS students who are not interested in a four-year degree. We need to bring in companies that offer a wide range of employment opportunities, not just high-level jobs. Establishing Charlotte as a city with upward mobility requires delivering mobility at every educational level. This means that we must attract companies who will employ locally, not simply transplant employees from other cities.
I support public funding for the arts/cultural organizations as well as for other social requirements such as parks/greenways and supplement teacher salaries. Quality of life is not satisfied through the strictly functional measures of employment and transportation, it is built through an investment in the character of a city. This character comes through a complex mixture of its culture, its environment, and its history. Charlotte must nurture this culture and continue to invest and will reap the rewards of this investment through growth and prosperity. However, I want to see measures put into place that ensure that the funding is equitably distributed so all communities can benefit. Unfortunately, public officials are not legally obligated or bound by the spending plan to allocate the money as it is outlined. Thus, if this sales tax passes, we need to make sure we hold those who proposed the tax increase accountable and ensure the funds are going where they were initially allocated.