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Cumberland County Magisterial District Justice 09-3-04

Salary: $91,5976 year term - Covers Hampden Township and Silver Spring Township The judicial system in Cumberland County starts at the magisterial district judge level.These courts are presided over by Magisterial District Judges (MDJs). MDJs do not have to be lawyers, but they are required to pass a qualifying exam.MDJs hold preliminary arraignments and preliminary hearings before potentially sending the case to the Cumberland County Court of Common Pleas, if there is enough evidence in the case or if the hearing is waived by the defendant.Responsibilities:Determine whether serious criminal cases go to the Court of Common PleasPreliminary arraignments and preliminary hearingsSetting and accepting bail, except in murder or voluntary manslaughter cases

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    Kathryn Silcox
    (Dem)

  • Candidate picture

    Kathryn Silcox
    (Rep)

Biographical Information

What is the most important quality in a judge?

Under what circumstances would you recuse or have you recused yourself from a case?

As a member of the judiciary, what can you do on and off the bench to ensure that all Pennsylvanians have access to justice?

Campaign Phone (717) 649-2085
campaign email address Mdjsilcox@gmail.com
Fairness. It is important for a judge to listen to both sides making sure all have been heard. The judge then needs to weigh the evidence presented in a fair and impartial manner in order to make a decision. This process is achieved when the judge treats people with respect, understanding, and uses common sense. In the end, both sides need to walk away knowing that they were treated fairly and respectfully.
I recuse myself in any matter where I feel that my relationship with one of the litigants may appear to influence my judgement. Although I may believe that I can be fair and impartial, if my relationship with a litigant gives the mere appearance of favorable treatment, then I think it is important to move the matter to another court. I have recused myself in cases where I know one of the litigants personally and where I believe, based upon the nature of the case, that it may involve the discussion of personal information or personal details that the parties may not have wanted revealed to someone the know.
I encourage litigants, including police officers, to let me know ahead of a court date if an accommodation is needed. For example, I often request interpreters for persons who may need assistance with language translation. This is particularly important in a court setting where legal terms may not be understood or where terms may have different meanings. I also take a few minutes before beginning a hearing to explain to litigants how the matter will proceed. They then know what to expect and when they will have their time to testify. I believe this makes people more comfortable with the process.
Campaign Phone (717) 649-2085
campaign email address Mdjsilcox@gmail.com
Fairness. It is important for a judge to listen to both sides making sure all have been heard. The judge then needs to weigh the evidence presented in a fair and impartial manner in order to make a decision. This process is achieved when the judge treats people with respect, understanding, and uses common sense. In the end, both sides need to walk away knowing that they were treated fairly and respectfully.
I recuse myself in any matter where I feel that my relationship with one of the litigants may appear to influence my judgement. Although I may believe that I can be fair and impartial, if my relationship with a litigant gives the mere appearance of favorable treatment, then I think it is important to move the matter to another court. I have recused myself in cases where I know one of the litigants personally and where I believe, based upon the nature of the case, that it may involve the discussion of personal information or personal details that the parties may not have wanted revealed to someone the know.
I encourage litigants, including police officers, to let me know ahead of a court date if an accommodation is needed. For example, I often request interpreters for persons who may need assistance with language translation. This is particularly important in a court setting where legal terms may not be understood or where terms may have different meanings. I also take a few minutes before beginning a hearing to explain to litigants how the matter will proceed. They then know what to expect and when they will have their time to testify. I believe this makes people more comfortable with the process.