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Colorado House District 63

The Colorado House of Representatives is the lower house of the Colorado General Assembly, the State legislature of the U.S. state of Colorado. The House is composed of 65 members. Representatives are elected to two-year terms, and are limited to four terms in office but can run again after a two year respite.

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  • Brandon D Bodian
    (Dem)

  • Candidate picture

    Joe Johnson
    (Lib)

  • Lori Saine
    (Rep)

Biographical Information

What would you cite as the number one issue facing constituents in the district you’re seeking to represent, and specifically what legislation would you champion to address it?

What specific changes, if any, do you think should be made to Colorado laws concerning access to abortion and reproductive health care?

What specifically are the most urgent needs of Colorado’s education system and the best legislative strategies for meeting those needs?

It is projected that Colorado will face a water shortfall by 2050 or sooner. What specific measures would you support to prevent a water crisis?

If elected, what specifically would you do to make health care more affordable in Colorado?

How would you address the growing lack of affordable housing in Colorado in terms of a specific policy or policies?

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Contact phone 303-549-0616
Background Former Trustee, Town of Frederick, CO Former Chairman, Libertarian Party of Boulder County
Traffic (more specifically inadequate infrastructure). With 5.68 million people in Colorado (up 16.9% from 2000), we are the second fastest growing state in the Union *. This has put a heavy burden on the highways and roadways of this great state. This year there are two proposals on the ballot to address traffic. One will raise taxes on an already heavily taxed population, the other will kick the can down the road by issuing more debt; neither will resolve the underlying problem. Every single driver in the state pays taxes on gasoline and registration fees. Ask yourself; where did the money go? The trouble lies with the fact that those taxes can be spent on projects outside of transportation. If elected I will fight to keep the taxes that drivers pay for roads to be spent on - - ROADS. More drivers on Colorado’s roads equal more taxes paid. Remember, any tax increase now is PERMANENT, and money that you cannot spend on things necessary for your family. * worldpopulationreview.com
As a Libertarian, I view EVERY issue through the lens of individual liberty, and personal responsibility. Reproductive health and abortion are very personal issues and should remain with the individual. As such, any restriction on an individual’s right to choose the medical care right for him or her must be resisted. By the same token, any and all funding for such care must be borne by the recipient and/or the recipient’s insurance provider, or charitable contributions. Taking funds by force through taxation from those who hold objections to such procedures - whether on moral, religious, or other grounds - is nothing short of criminal. Just as a woman has, and ought to have, the right to choice in reproductive care, so too should the individual taxpayer have the right to choose what care to fund. We have the right to choose what we do with our bodies, we DO NOT have the right to demand that others pay for those choices.
Education in America is broken, not just in Colorado, but nationwide. Once one of the most literate nations on earth, the United States now rank 125 out of 197 nations listed *. The declining of America’s literacy corresponds eerily to the rise of Government intervention into education. With the creation of the Department of Education in 1979, more national enforcement of standards on education has resulted in not only less state control of education, but lower and lower literacy rates. If parents are caring and responsible enough to house, feed, and clothe their children, why should it be presumed then that politicians can do a better job of providing education to those children than parents? Colorado has taken steps in the direction of education freedom, but much more needs to be done. It is high time that we stop presuming that politicians can be trusted to the job of education, and give back the freedom (and responsibility) of education to parents and teachers. *Worldatlas.com
In Colorado there is a saying; “Whiskey is for drinking, water is for fight’n”, and that has never been more true than today. The 1922 Colorado River Compact made sense when it was passed, but the populations of all seven stated that depend on the Colorado River for their water supply, have grown over the past couple of decades. This has put a heavy demand on the Colorado River. The state legislature is currently working on a new water plan, and I am excited at the prospect of being elected and participating in such planning. During my tenure as Trustee for the town of Frederick, I was fortunate to work on that town’s water plan, and as a result Frederick’s water supply is well situated for many years to come. If the voters choose to elect me in November, I will work to assure that they have adequate water for their families.
Thanks to Obamacare, affordable Medical care is no longer an option. As a result of that legislation, all Americans are required to purchase medical insurance. Any such legislation ALWAYS increases prices. This is a basic law of economics, which cannot be broken. The ONLY way to bring affordable medical care to America is to undo the poor political decisions dating back to the 1940’s. Government interference in the medical free market, from the price and wage controls of WWII which spawned employer “benefits”, to HMOs’ and PPO’s, to Medicaid and Medicare, and now Obamacare, politicians never admit that they made bad decisions, instead they double-down and make the situation worse. Because of these past poor decisions, Costa Rico is now a destination location for “Medical Tourism.” All is not lost however. Colorado could resist Washington’s meddling in the economy, and declare that our citizens are not bound by Obamacare, just as it has resisted Washington on the issue of marijuana.
Housing is a local issue, and the answers to “affordable housing” are found at the local level. Any additional taxes and regulation at the state level will only continue to place affordable options out of reach. Unfortunately, it has been my experience while serving as Trustee for the town of Frederick, that most city councils and town boards resist “affordable” housing options, preferring instead larger, more expensive homes for their tax base and increased property values. However, just as the ski resort towns have discovered, without a full mix of housing options, entire industries can grind to a halt for the want of an affordable workforce. A dearth of low cost housing means a dearth of entry level workers, and businesses that are dependent on such cannot/will not do business in such a city/town. The market always works out such issues IF the politicians will get out of the way and let the market will self-correct. Towns that embrace a diverse mix of housing get diverse industry.
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