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Louisville City Council Ward I

As a home rule city operating under a council-manager form of government, the City Council is the governing body of the City. The City Charter lays out the rules and regulations under which the City operates.The Mayor is elected at-large and two council members are elected from each of the City's three wards, each to a four-year term. (Vote for one)
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    Chris Leh Attorney

Change Candidates

Biographical Information

What are the three major issues the City faces in the next five years?

How would you approach the City budget process and address any budget shortfalls in the future?

What are you thoughts about the need to improve Louisville’s current infrastructure (roads, schools, water, emergency response, etc.) or can these be easily adapted to provide for the current residential growth?

How would you resolve concerns of downtown residents, business owners and performers regarding noise levels?

Contact e-mail Christophermleh@gmail.com
Contact phone 303.668.3916
Connectivity — to preserve our small town character, we must continue to knit different parts of Louisville together by strengthening our trail system and open spaces, building planned underpasses, and adding at least one more on South Boulder Road that will protect our schoolchildren, pedestrians, and cyclists and make the City more liveable.

Transportation & Traffic —We must negotiate wisely and work collaboratively with our neighbors and the state to better manage increased traffic resulting from rampant development along the I-25 corridor, encourage last-mile solutions to enable residents more easily to use mass transit, and push for additional regional and state resources for the northwest corridor from Denver to Boulder.

Economic Sustainability – we largely rely on sales tax revenue to fund our City services. We must continue to be careful stewards of public dollars. We also must continue to attract and sustain businesses that can help support our community for the longer term
We have been fiscally conservative in Louisville. As Colorado cities must, we balance our budget each year, of course. But we carefully manage our fund reserves and our capital projects to anticipate potential changes in tax receipts and City needs. When there are unanticipated increases in capital spending, for example, we have made hard choices by either delaying projects or cutting them entirely. Finally, we have implemented a biennial program-based budget, which helps us to take a longer view of planning for both revenues and expenditures. We are especially proud that these processes are transparent and that we carefully seek and incorporate the input of our residents.
Residential growth in Louisville has slowed substantially because we are nearly built out. But past growth and the expansion of neighboring communities are straining our infrastructure. We’re addressing problems of deferred roadway maintenance through an aggressive, cost-effective paving program that is substantially improving the quality of City streets. We look forward the completing the voter-approved Rec./Sr. Center & outdoor pool renovations. Also, we need to continue to work with the Boulder Valley School District to deploy adequate resources to meet the needs of our students and their families. Finally, we are proud of our collaboration with the Boulder County Housing Authority and others to have established the Kestrel development, with its 200 affordable housing units, including 129 for families and 71 specifically for seniors. We also expect to participate with other Boulder County communities to meet county affordable housing objectives.
The good news is that we have had very few noise complaints in Louisville (12 during the past 3 years). Our City has enacted an ordinance that prohibits disturbing the peace. When a complaint arises, our police department investigates and seeks to resolve the problem by mediating between the parties. This method of reasonable conflict resolution draws on community policing standards. It ensures that our residents are able to enjoy a reasonable amount of peace and quiet, that our businesses and other residents are able to enjoy music and socializing at reasonable levels, and that are police are not forced into ham-fisted, inefficient enforcement of the law.

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